Websites

1. Parenting

http://www.bbc.co.uk/parenting/

This website is aimed at offering advice and support to parents. It is a good general resource about child development with a focus, primarily, on early years development. The information focuses primarily on parenting and tips for increasing creativity in young infants and children. This is an easily accessible website and offers a non-academic view relating to some of the key issues around parenting.

 

2. Child of our Time

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/whats-on/tv/ou-on-the-bbc-child-our-time-2013

For a number of years the Open University and the BBC have been following a group of children born in 2000.  The website that accompanies the programme offers discussions about childhood in today’s society and resources about cognitive, social and a number of aspects of developmental psychology. It contains a wealth of information, including expert views and information on a range of different methods that psychologists use to study child development. The range of video links to accompany the information is a valuable resource for students.

 

3. Psychology at About.com

http://psychology.about.com/od/developmentstudyguide/p/devintro.htm

The web page provides a summary of key theories in developmental psychology in an easily accessible way. There are additional links to issues in child development, a range of quizzes and related articles enough to stimulate and engage.  You can follow the links to find out additional information about a range of developmental psychologists and their research interests. This is a great way to support the material contained within the chapter and beyond.

 

4. Science Daily: Child Development News

http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/mind_brain/child_development/

This is an extremely interesting, fast-paced website that reports on the most recent research in the child development field. Naturally the focus tends to be on studies that capture the public’s interest, or are current ‘hot topics’ for discussion and debate. We would recommend using this as a resource to spark off your own interests and ideas.  For more detailed information on specific topics try typing researcher’s names and Universities into Google.

 

5. The National Literacy Trust

http://www.literacytrust.org.uk/database/read.html

This is an excellent website, which highlights key research paper abstracts and developments in the field of reading and literacy research. There are additional web links contained which provide a range of research papers and key reports relating to the development of early literacy in children.