Websites

1. A Class Divided

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/divided/

The focus of this website is the lesson of a teacher who divided her class by eye colour to teach them about discrimination. The two day experience was filmed and the programme (as well as other programmes exploring discrimination) is available to view on the website. This work has since expanded so the website is full of useful resources and links to further work. This is an ideal website to understand the effects and impact of discrimination from both perspectives – that of the person behaving in a discriminating way and the person being discriminated against.    

 

2. Jigsaw Classroom

 http://www.jigsaw.org/

This website documents the process known as the ‘Jigsaw Technique’. If you are interested in conflict reduction techniques then this is the website for you. It operates mostly with children in the education system through the process of learning about a new topic. It involves a team who all need to work together to achieve a common goal – remind you of any theories?  

 

3. Understanding Prejudice

http://www.understandingprejudice.org/

Although this website does not have content per se, this is a comprehensive repository for resources and links which focus on understanding prejudice. There are web links, exercises, examples and up to date debates/issues highlighting prejudice. Find out how prejudiced you really are!

 

4. International Conflict Research (INCORE)

http://www.incore.ulst.ac.uk/about/

This is another link to follow if you are interested in conflict resolution, although this example is on an international (rather than a classroom) scale. Originally based around the conflict in Northern Ireland this website draws on a multidisciplinary (politics, sociology, policy-makers, history, geography) approach to explore the causes and consequences of conflict. It also highlights possible strategies for the reduction of conflict in general.

 

5. Solomon Asch Center

http://www.aschcenter.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

Based on the activities and output of the Asch Center (you might recognise the name Asch as a very influential author in social psychology and research methods), this website draws from across social science to analyse the causes and effects of ethnic conflict. The focus of the blogs in particular is to explore and discuss recent political and physical ethnic conflict. The authors of the blogs are informed people within the research area.